Potato Review Group

Contents

Background

Risk of gangrene

Chemical control

Further information:

Gangrene notes

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Background

  1. Gangrene (Phoma foveata) fungal inoculum may be seed or soil borne.
  2. Hyphae from infected tubers grow into developing stems.
  3. The disease remains dormant till stems die, when spores are released.
  4. Rain splash distributes spores and progeny tubers may become infected at eyes or via proliferated lenticels.
  5. Tubers can also become infected through wounds at harvest.
  6. Infected tubers can rot during storage.

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Risk of gangrene

  1. Infection of tubers occurs through wounds during harvesting and handling.
  2. The risk of infection is increased by harvesting in cold, wet conditions.
  3. The disease can develop at low temperature during storage.
  4. Crops which are deficient in nutrients may be more susceptible. More …

More …

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Chemical control

  1. Thiabendazole or imazalil may be applied post-harvest to seed potatoes (see Seed treatment).
  2. Chemical control is more likely to be effective during storage than applied before planting seed potatoes.

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Further information

Gangrene notes

Transmission of seed borne diseases 2018 (Infection occurs as hyphae from infected tubers grow into developing stems, spores may then infect tubers)

Tuber rotting diseases 2001 (Includes gangrene biology and conditions for development)

Dry rot 2000 (Includes influence of nutrition on Phoma)

 

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