Potato Review Group

Contents

Background

Symptoms

Reducing the risk of infection

Further information:

Pink rot notes

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Background

  1. Pink rot is caused by the oomycete Phytophthora erythroseptica.
  2. Oomycetes are fungus-like organisms.
  3. Pink rot is a soil borne disease, originating from oospores in soil.
  4. The disease may be seen in hot, wet conditions.

More …

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Symptoms

  1. Symptoms in foliage include wilting but may be indistinct.
  2. Infected tubers develop a pink coloration when cut; this later turns brown or black.

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Reducing the risk of infection

  1. There are no control measures to prevent infection from soil but infection may be facilitated by damage to roots or stolons, e.g. mechanical damage by nematodes or chemical damage from high concentrations of fertiliser in the ridge. More …
  2. Application of phosphite may help to protect tubers against infection by increasing plant resistance. More …
  3. Development of the disease is favoured by hot, wet conditions, e.g. irrigation in a hot summer.
  4. The incidence of disease is greater in old plants and late in the season – therefore harvest early.
  5. Handle tubers carefully at harvest.
  6. Store tubers under cool (4oC), dry conditions.

More …

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Further information

Pink rot notes

Pink rot control 2013 (Life cycle; fungicide resistance; suppression by phosphite-induced plant resistance)

Pink rot update 2006 (Survival of oospores; potential methods of control or suppression)

Tuber rotting diseases 2001 (Includes pink rot: importance of temperature)

Pink rot 1996 (Conditions for disease development)

 

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